Oversized Load Hauling in Oakland, IA

With decades of experience in standard and oversized load hauling, Steve Emken Trucking employs a highly reputable team of owner-operator truck drivers in Oakland, IA. These diligent, seasoned big rig drivers provide clients with the best in long haul transportation services—whether you need to move freight across the state or the country. Additionally, count on our in-office employees to provide drivers with the dispatch support needed to deliver your cargo on time.

Gray truck

  • Flatbed hauling: When you need equipment moved to a new job site or transported back to your storage facility, count on our drivers to get your heavy machinery to its final destination.
  • Step-deck hauling: Called by many names step deck, single drop, drop deck or open deck hauling makes it simple to transport a variety of cargo wherever it needs to go. Unlike over-dimensional hauling, step-deck hauling doesn’t require any special permits. Nonetheless, we still take every precaution when loading and transporting your oversized freight.
  • Short hauling: Move goods, equipment and other shipments across the state or throughout the region confidently, knowing it’ll arrive on time and undamaged. Our short hauling services get your cargo to its designated destination throughout Iowa and the rest of the Midwest.
  • Long hauling: Though our headquarters is in Oakland, IA, our long-haul transportation services take our drivers across the country. It doesn’t matter where the destination is in the lower 48: one of our drivers can get there with your freight.
  • Over-dimensional hauling: Over-dimensional cargo (ODC) is any freight that extends beyond the length or width of a truck’s loading deck. We specialize in over-dimensional hauling service with a fleet of flatbed drivers at-the-ready. Trust our understanding of the laws governing ODC transportation over both short and long distances. Rest assured we obtain any necessary permitting when hauling your ODC.
  • Expedited hauling: Don’t delay a project or job because you can’t get necessary freight to its intended location on-time. We offer expedited hauling for businesses that need equipment or goods as soon as possible.
  • Dry Van Freight: Dry van trailers, or box trailers, can be described as a rectangular box on wheels with doors. They are designed to transport equipment and boxes or pallets of cargo. There is no temperature control in regular dry van trailers, so they are designed for any shipment except oversize freight or perishable, temperature-sensitive goods.

Steven Emken Trucking provides affordably-priced oversized load hauling solutions to companies in and around Oakland, IA. Call 712-741-5452 to learn more about our services. We’re happy to provide spot pricing upon request.


COILS – EYE TO THE SIDE

Eye To Side E2da8f4b2552c

CAUTIONCRST/Malone recommends that drivers load coils in eye-to-the-side position only when required by the shipper.

Shotgun (eye-forward) position is CRST/Malone’s preferred loading method.

**If coil or groupings of coils equals 5000 pounds or greater, each must have coil racks and dunnage.**

Coils, Eye to the Side

  1. Place rubber belting for coil racks to rest on.
  2. Set one coil rack for each side with the small edge of the lumber facing up.
    • For coils under 30,000 pounds, use small coil racks and beveled 4×4 lumber.
    • For coils over 30,000 pounds, use large coil racks and beveled 6×6 lumber.
  3. Lay rubber belting and waterproof paper on timbers according to shipper’s specifications, and set the coil on the timbers.
  4. Using edge protection at all points of contact, secure chains based on coil weight:
    • Up to 20,000 lbs: Three chains straight through coil. (see figure 3)
    • 20,000 – 40,000 lbs: Five chains straight through coil. (see figure 5)
    • 40,000 Plus lbs: Seven chains straight through coil. (see figure 6)
  5. Tarp the load securely as required.
  6. Secure all loose equipment, including chains and binders, lumber, tarps, rubber belting, coil racks, edge protectors, and load bar.

COILS – SHOTGUN

Coils Shotgun 277efddc67553

Coils, Eye Forward (‘Shotgun’)

  1. Place rubber belting for coils racks to rest on.
  2. Set one coil rack for each 10,000 pounds of coil weight (minimum of three) and lay beveled lumber on each side with the small edge facing up.
    • For coils under 30,000 pounds, use small coil racks and beveled 4×4 lumber.
    • For coils over 30,000 pounds, use large coiled racks and beveled 6×6 lumber.
  3. Lay rubber belting and waterproof paper on timbers according to shipper’s specifications, and set the coil on the timbers.
  4. Use edge protection at all points of contact.
  5. Secure pairs of chains in an X through the eye of the coil. Use one chain for every 10,000 pounds of coil weight, plus an extra chain for safety.
  6. Secure a trip chain in front using wood blocking as shown to keep chain from touching the coil.
  7. Secure a top chain over the top of the coil.
    • NOTE: At least one chain or strap is required to be placed over the top of the coil. Use rubber belting between the chain and coil.
  8. Tarp the load securely as required.
  9. Secure all loose equipment, including chains and binders, lumber, tarps, rubber belting, coil racks, edge protectors, and load bar.

COILS – EYE TO THE SKY

Eye To Sky Df254f03936c3

Coils, Eye to the Sky

  1. After loading the coil on the trailer in the approved location, check the pallet and binding to make sure they are secure and in good condition.
  2. Using rubber belting, secure one chain over the top of the coil, centered on each side.
  3. Using rubber belting, secure two chains in an X over the coil, on top of the first chain.
  4. Be sure that the Xis spread over the coil to ensure that the coil will not slip out from under the chains.
  5. Using rubber belting, secure a trip chain around the front of the coil. If securing more than one coil, use one trip chain around the front of the front coil, and one around the rear of the rear coil.
  6. Tarp the load securely as required.
  7. Secure all loose equipment, including chains and binders, lumber, tarps, rubber belting, coil racks, edge protectors, and load bar.